Practice Getting Over Bad Shots

I know, the title sounds a bit odd doesn’t it? You might be asking why would I want to and how would I practice getting over them?

You’re putting in a lot of practice time so that you don’t hit bad shots. You might be working with a teacher/coach to gain more consistency so why on earth should you do this? The reason is that golf is a hard game and while it’s probably a bit easier than most people make it, you will never perfect it. You will always hit shots that are disappointing or that don’t turn out the way you had intended. And frankly, if your shots were always perfect the game wouldn’t have the draw and allure that it does. Just watch a tour event for this reason next time. Tour players ALWAYS hit bad shots. It’s just a challenging game. So that said, since everyone, even the best players in the world hit bad shots, shouldn’t you be preparing yourself for this? The answer is absolutely!

Here’s how:

On the chipping green, even if you’re working on your technique, after hitting a bad chip shot, don’t rake over another ball and go again. Instead, train yourself to put down your wedge and pick up your putter. Then go finish it out. Even if you don’t make the putt you’ll be training yourself that every shot in your pile of chipping balls matters and you’ll be training yourself to deal with it and getting over it.

When you’re on the range, after you hit a poor iron for instance, resist pulling over another attempt/ball. Grab a wedge and pretend you missed the green with your iron by hitting that wedge to a target close to you as if you had a pitch shot remaining.

That’s how you practice getting over bad shots and that’s how you’ll move on and perform better on the next shot when you’re on the course or in a tournament.
Sounds simple and it really is. You just have to make your practices productive. If your practices don’t help you play better then they’re probably helping you play worse!

Practice Smart